Keyword Mining Guide

2021-09-14| Guide|views(1809)|Comments(0)

Keyword Mining stands as a powerful tool which provides sellers with the most current data on traffic-driving keywords being used by consumers within the current market. SellerSprite Keyword Database is sourced entirely from accurate data compilations taken from Amazon’s Search Database, reflective of both historical and current Amazon Shopper behavior. 

It is important to note that a seller can access the Keyword Mining tool from 2 unique locations: from the dedicated SellerSprite domain, or rather www.SellerSprite.com, and from the browser extension. The first portion of the guide extrapolates on the domain, while the second portion discusses the browser extension. Now begins a closer look into the Keyword Mining tool on the website. 


Firstly, a seller accessing Keyword Mining may take notice of 2 unique functions to be found in this portion of the software, titled “Get Keywords” and “Intelligent Mining.” 


To put it plainly, the “Get Keywords” function of Keyword Mining grants sellers access to unique searches of phrase matching keywords driving traffic to listings utilizing the same. This function is meant for sellers seeking keywords containing the entered word or phrase.


“Intelligent Mining” posits broad matching keywords surrounding a particular product or phrase. This type of Keyword Mining utilizes SellerSprite’s dynamic data analysis offering sellers keywords bearing broad, market-specific, relation with the seller-set phrase.  



Get Keywords


Now begins a closer look into the “Get Keywords” function.


Having selected “Get Keywords,” a seller has the ability to choose the region of the Amazon Market within which Keyword Mining is to take place, choosing from the United States, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Canada, or India.


 


If a seller, for example, were to execute a search after entering the keyword “storage bins,” over 2,400 keywords related to the seller-entered search show on the results page below. 


Here there are 10 columns, with each representing a vital piece of the puzzle that is the inner-machinations of the online marketplace, most especially in relation to the entered keyword(s).


That said, now begins naming and describing the results portion of the Get Keywords function within Keyword Mining, beginning with the pound sign on the very left-hand side of the page and ending with the 3 actionable buttons found at the end of each row. 


It would behoove the seller to engage with each actionable piece of data available as shown in the results. 


 


The “#” column, which is to say the pound sign column, simply reveals the rank of the keyword(s) according to search volume, a la “Descending,” or “Ascending.” 


The Keyword column posits keywords directly related to the seller-entered search within the chosen market set above, ranked by default in descending order by number of searches within a calendar month.


The Category column indicates popular categories assigned to products while searching the keyword from all departments. This helps to identify the sub-market in which this keyword belongs.


The Search Trends column displays an extremely insightful graph which depicts a bare-bones visual representation of the number of consumer searches using the particular keyword month-to-month over the past several years. Only keywords that have met the data index requirements of the system will bear historical search trends. 


The Month column either simply displays a simple orange circle, meaning there were searches for this keyword within the most recent month, or the most recent month where there were indexable searches for the keyword. 


The Searches/M column bears 2 unique values, with the number on top representative of the keyword’s total number of searches over the past several years and the number below it representative of the total number of searches conducted using said keyword within the past day.


The Click Concentration column indicates a percentage representative of monopolistic presence in the sub-market related to the particular keyword shown. Click Concentration is calculated by taking the top three ASINs’ number of clicks combined, divided by the total amount of clicks.


The Products column posits 2 unique values, with the number on top representative of the total number of products which appear after searching for this keyword and the number below it representative of the product’s particular DSR, or Demand-to-Supply Ratio.


The Market Analysis column reveals the average listing price, total number of ratings, and average consumer rating of the products ranking within the first 3 pages of a search using the particular keyword. 


The PPC Bid, rather the Pay-per-Click Bid, column reveals the minimum, or the lowest, amount spent, the recommended spend, and the maximum, or the highest, amount spent by sellers at auction for the shown keyword. 


It’s important to note that most of the data contained within the aforementioned columns is actionable, meaning that if a seller were to click on a specific point of data, they would be brought onto a page detailing extensive data analysis concerning the column’s particular data point. More information on these functions may be found throughout guides specific to other areas of the SellerSprite arena, or inside the interactive and engaging *SellerSprite Course Set*.


On the far right-hand side of the results portion of Keyword Mining results, there lies 3 actionable buttons per row. The foremost, symbolized by a bar graph, will bring the seller onto a page depicting a variety of visual aids representative of the keyword’s historical search trends over the past several years.

 


The icon underneath the historical search trends bears hyperlinks which can direct the seller onto tools reliant on the usage of specific keyword(s), and offers the ability to locally export historical data relevant to the keyword. 


The third and final icon directs a seller onto Google Trends, which stands as an important tool for sellers to utilize in conjunction with Keyword Mining. 


For more information on this tool, and how to use the information provided when using this tool, be sure to follow alongside the *Keyword Mining Course Set*.



Intelligent Mining


So ends the portion of the guide concerning the “Get Keywords” function of Keyword Mining, and now begins a closer look into the “Intelligent Mining” function.



 

“Intelligent Mining” posits broad matching keywords surrounding a particular product or phrase. This type of Keyword Mining utilizes SellerSprite’s dynamic data analysis offering sellers keywords bearing broad, market-specific, relation with the seller-set phrase.  


Having selected “Intelligent Mining,” a seller has the ability to choose the region of the Amazon Market within which Keyword Mining is to take place, choosing from the United States, Japan, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Canada, or India.


If a seller, for example, were to execute a search after entering the keyword “storage bins,” over 2,400 keywords related to the seller-entered search show on the results page below. 


Here there are 11 columns, with each representing a vital piece of the puzzle that is the inner-machinations of the online marketplace, most especially in relation to the consumer demand and market dominance associated with the entered keyword(s).

That said, now begins naming and describing the results portion of the Intelligent Mining function within Keyword Mining, beginning with the pound sign on the very left-hand side of the page and ending with the 3 actionable buttons found at the end of each row. 


It would behoove the seller to engage with each actionable piece of data available as shown in the results. 

 



The “#” column, which is to say the pound sign column, simply reveals the rank of the keyword(s) according to keyword efficacy, a la “Descending,” or “Ascending.” 


The Keyword column is arranged by default according to its relation to the entered search alongside its efficacy within the market. 


The Category column indicates the most popular categories assigned to products while searching the keyword from all departments. 


The Search Trends column displays an extremely insightful graph which depicts a bare-bones visual representation of the number of consumer searches using the particular keyword month-to-month over the past several years. Only keywords that have met the data index requirements of the system will bear historical search trends. 


The Month column either simply displays a simple orange circle, meaning there were searches for this keyword within the most recent month, or the most recent month where there were indexable searches for the keyword. 


The Searches/M column bears 2 unique values, with the number on top representative of the keyword’s total number of searches over the past several years and the number below it representative of the total number of searches conducted using said keyword within the past day.


The Efficacy column posits the keyword’s efficacy value on a scale of 1 to 5, representative of a keyword’s value in driving traffic to related products within the sub-market. Rather, the greater the efficacy value, the higher rate of traffic the keyword brings to products falling under that keyword’s sub-market. 


The Click Concentration column indicates a percentage representative of monopolistic presence in the sub-market related to the particular keyword shown. Click Concentration is calculated by taking the top three ASINs’ number of clicks combined, divided by the total amount of clicks.


The Products column posits 2 unique values, with the number on top representative of the total number of products which appear after searching for this keyword and the number below it representative of the product’s particular DSR, or Demand-to-Supply Ration.


The Market Analysis column reveals the average listing price, total number of ratings, and average consumer rating of the products ranking within the first 3 pages of a search using the particular keyword. 


The PPC Bid, rather the Pay-per-Click Bid, column reveals the minimum, or the lowest, amount spent, the recommended spend, and the maximum, or the highest, amount spent by sellers at auction for the shown keyword. 


It’s important to note that most of the data contained within the aforementioned columns is actionable, meaning that if a seller were to click on a specific point of data, they would be brought onto a page detailing extensive data analysis concerning the column’s particular data point. More information on these functions may be found throughout guides specific to other areas of the SellerSprite arena, or inside the interactive and engaging *SellerSprite Course Set*.


On the far right-hand side of the results portion of Keyword Mining results, there lies 3 actionable buttons per row. The foremost, symbolized by a bar graph, will bring the seller onto a page depicting a variety of visual aids representative of the keyword’s historical search trends over the past several years.

 


The icon underneath the historical search trends bears hyperlinks which can direct the seller onto tools reliant on the usage of specific keyword(s), and offers the ability to locally export historical data relevant to the keyword. 


The third and final icon directs a seller onto Google Trends, which stands as an important tool for sellers to utilize in conjunction with Keyword Mining. 


So ends the explanation of the Keyword Mining tool on the dedicated SellerSprite domain, and now begins a brief examination of the Keyword Mining tool from the Browser Extension. 




Browser Extension


The Keyword Mining tool on the Browser Extension differs little-to-none from the tool on the dedicated domain in terms of content provided. 


Similar to the operation of the tool on the domain, to properly execute either function of Keyword Mining from the extension, a broad search should be entered directly into Amazon. If a seller were to, for example, enter a search for “storage bins” under All Departments, they would be subsequently met with 3 actionable items appearing directly underneath the search bar. 


Selecting “Get Relevant Keywords” will open a slide-out resembling the following image. 

 



By default, the Browser Extension selects the “Intelligent Mining” function of Keyword Mining. A seller should be familiar with the shown results page. 


To switch onto the alternate function of Keyword Mining, simply engage with the drop-down menu located next to the search bar on the extension slide-out. The 2 unique functions display here, those being “Intelligent Mining” and “Get Keywords.”

Selecting “Get Keywords” reveals yet another familiar sight.


For more information on this tool, and how to use the information provided when using this tool, be sure to follow alongside the *Keyword Mining Course Set*.


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